Preview: Past Present Podcast

We’re mixing things up a little bit here at The Low Down. We decided to feature a discussion from Past Present, a podcast that’s produced by three Columbia alumni: Nicole Hemmer '05GSAS, '06GSAS, '10GSAS (a research associate at the Miller Center for Public Affairs in Charlottesville, Virginia), Natalia Mehlman Petrzela '00CC (an assistant professor of history at The New School), and Neil Young '04GSAS, '05GSAS, '08GSAS (a historian and author of We Gather Together: The Religious Right and the Problem of Interfaith Politics).

Read more

Columbians at SXSW

South by Southwest (SXSW) is the conference of all conferences, held in Austin, Texas from March 11-20. In its 29th year, the nine days encompass three festivals: Interactive, Music, and Film.  SXSW organizers say it's the premier destination for discovery; The New Republic once called it spring break for nerds.  

Anywhere there's a critical mass of thinkers, artists, makers, and influencers, there are Columbians.  Read on for our list of alumni and faculty who will be at SXSW 2016.  If you'll be there, let us know and we'll add you to the list; and don't miss the Columbia University Club of Austin SXSW event on March 12.

Read more

Your Weekly Low Down | March 4, 2016

Catch up on the latest news from your Columbia alumni community this week.

Read more

The 10,000 Year Forecast: Columbia and Climate

As climate continues to dominate the national conversation, Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) is a powerful player in the fight to conserve our planet.  LDEO scientists are at the forefront in understanding the risks to human life and property from extreme weather events, both in the present and future climates, and on developing solutions to mitigate those risks. Hear directly from Dr. Arthur Lerner-Lam, deputy director of LDEO, as he discusses why climate research is more pressing now than ever before, and how Columbia, like no other university, is tackling the big challenges of today's climate landscape. 

Read more

ON ALUMNI LEADERSHIP by Brian Krisberg

Veteran alumni leader and chair of Columbia Alumni Association (CAA) Brian Krisberg ('81CC, '84LAW, P: '18CC) recently spoke to Columbia alumni relations professionals about his long history of leadership and volunteerism at Columbia.

Excerpts from his speech are provided below.

***

Read more

Your Weekly Low Down | Feb. 26, 2016

Catch up on the latest news from your Columbia alumni community this week.

Read more

The 10,000 Year Forecast: Columbia Expert on Climate

As climate continues to dominate the national conversation, Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is a powerful player in the fight to conserve our planet.

A view of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory's
campus in Palisades, NY (Photo: Lamont-Doherty)

Read on for five things you might not know about Lamont-Doherty’s work on climate: 

 

Read more

Making a Career Change: Switching Industries

By Julia Harris Wexler '83TC, '14BUS, Columbia University Certified Executive Career Coach

Mid-career shifting is perhaps one of the most common, yet least researched challenges faced by our generation. Let's look at the dynamics:

1) Most professionals begin their careers after graduating college or graduate school in their mid to late 20s. Their work life will last until their early 60s to late 70s on average.

2) This 40+ year span will most likely NOT be spent dedicated to only one field/industry or career.

Since it's logical that most professionals will need to reinvent themselves in order to leverage their prior skills in preparation for taking their places in their next careers, why is this topic still such a mystery?

That's why I specialize my coaching on this exact challenge: Mid-Career Shifts.

Mid-career shifting is perhaps one of the most common, yet least researched challenges faced by our generation.

Here is the method I use when coaching clients in tackling this issue:

Read more

Columbia Experts on the Discovery of Gravitational Waves

Last week, physics had a rare moment in the spotlight when scientists announced that they have successfully detected gravitational waves from the merging of two black holes roughly a billion light-years away. This incredible technological and scientific feat confirmed a major prediction in Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, published a century ago. 

Three Columbia astrophysicists were instrumental in the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) experiment, by building the complete timing system that was "essential in figuring out the direction in which we hear two black holes colliding." Their excitement was palpable as they took to the stage at Columbia to discuss the finding with an equally delighted Neil deGrasse Tyson ('91, '92GSAS) shortly after the historic announcement on February 11. (View the video here.)

The breakthrough was clearly a big moment for science, but why was it so important, and where will this discovery take us?

Here's what our notable Columbia astrophysicists, scientists, and professors have to say about it:

 

 

Read more

Your Weekly Low Down | Feb. 19, 2016

Catch up on the latest news from your Columbia alumni community this week.

Read more