Why Pursue Career Coaching?

By Eric Horwitz '90CC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network


Having a strong foundation of education is critical to an informed citizen in a free market society. A mixture of moral clarity and scientific reasoning can form the foundation for an active life of contributing and receiving abundance. Since the beginning of the university system, great men and eventually women were sequestered in a search for these empirical truths. Education is meant to develop individuals into contributing members of the social fabric.

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Want More Creativity in Your Career?

Alumna Lynn Berger '84, '90TC, of the Columbia Career Coaches Network, weighs in on how to have more creativity in the workplace through visualization strategies, and how it can help with your career and personal growth. 

Having more creativity in your work is a perfect, almost sure way to enjoy feelings of growth. And most of us have more creative powers than we give ourselves credit for.

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Trying to Change? How Self-Doubt Can Actually Help

Alumna Melody Wilding '11SW, of the Columbia Career Coaches Network, spoke about change and self-doubt during a recent TEDx talk. Read her thoughts and check out the talk below:

When it comes to change, we're often our own worst enemy. Anyone who has tried to embark on a professional or personal challenge is familiar with the voice of the inner critic that says things like "you're not good enough," "this is a stupid idea," "nothing will ever work out." Most self-development advice espouses the need to overcome self-doubt and banish negative thoughts. But as a therapist and Human Behavior professor, I know that this prevailing notion that calls for eradicating so-called "negative emotions" is not just plain wrong‚ÄĒit can actually backfire. While it's true that self-doubt can be toxic, what's more problematic is the fact that we never learn to deal with this normal, expected emotion in healthy ways. Any change brings up fear and worries‚ÄĒand learning to cope with uncertainty is a skill.

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The One Key Success Trait for Your Career

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network 
Originally published on SixFigureStart.com

If I could wish one success trait for my clients, it would be¬†follow-through‚ÄĒdoing¬†something¬†with the recommendations that are given.

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5 Reasons to Work with a Columbia Career Coach


The Columbia Career Coaches Network is a group of seasoned career professionals‚ÄĒand they're also your fellow alumni. Here, they weigh in on why it's incredibly valuable to work with a coach to better your career.¬†

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First Job Myths

By Michella Chiu '13GSAS of the Columbia Career Coaches Network

Whether your first "professional" job is important or not has been a prevalent debate, in which there are a multitude of answers and opinions. The sheer number of answer and opinions provided can be all right or all wrong. In reality, there are factors at play that are important and there are factors that are not. If you are a graduate fresh out of college, you need to judge what is important for you to consider with your first job and what is not vitally important.

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Decision-Making Strategies for Dual-Career Couples

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

As a recruiter, I've seen many job offers fall apart over the significant other. For example, in a relocation, the candidate was willing to make the move, but the partner nixed it. Even in an offer situation for the same city, a partner's hesitation could derail the deal. A deal-breaker raised by the significant other was so common that one of my recruiting colleagues always included a dinner with the partner during the selling process. 

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An Eight-Step Process to Discover Alternative Careers

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

Hannah asks: What are the best ways to determine alternative careers based on one's skills and experience, careers that might not be obvious?

The best way to learn a job is to do the job, but you can't try out every single career idea before settling on one‚ÄĒwho has the time or energy? So, you need to find a way to learn about a career from the outside looking in. Then you can make an informed choice about whether to commit your efforts in that direction. Here is an eight-step process for identifying viable alternative careers:

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What To Do When a Coworker Steals Credit for Your Work

By Melody Wilding '11SW of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

You're sitting in a meeting and a coworker takes credit for your idea. Or maybe you stay late to finish a project, but your name is left off of the final presentation. Your boss grabs the limelight and accepts all the praise.

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What To Do if You're Successful but Miserable at Your Job

By Julia Harris Wexler '83TC, '14BUS of the Columbia Career Coaches Network

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