The Future Is...Ayushi Roy: Human Rights at Home

Photo_Attachment_2.jpgIn this episode, we'll hear from a recent graduate who has been a champion of human rights and underrepresented groups since her time as a student leader on campus. I called Ayushi Roy '14CC in Oakland, CA, to hear about her work in public policy and her transition to graduate school at MIT this fall.

Ayushi graduated from Columbia College in 2014 with degrees in Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies, and Human Rights. She was active on and off campus around issues of migration and gender, working with the Intercultural Resource Center, the Columbia Political Review, and student-led Title IX groups, among others. After graduating, Ayushi stayed in New York for a year to work on her social venture, a sexual violence text-based hotline that won the first the Columbia Innovation Award.

She went on to serve as a Coro Fellow in Public Policy in San Francisco before transitioning to Oakland City Hall's first Civic Design Lab. She is beginning a master’s program in Urban Policy at MIT this fall

To learn more about sexual violence response and mental health at Columbia, visit health.columbia.edu.

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The Future Is...Nicole Crescimanno: The Art of Climate Activism

Nicole_Crescimanno.pngA self-described "climate activist," Nicole Crescimanno '11GSAS is a bridge between climate science researchers and the rest of us. As the program coordinator for Climate Science Awareness and Solutions at Columbia's Earth Institute, she works for the experts, translating their scary science into something we can understand and do something about.

Crescimanno obtained an MA in Climate and Society from Columbia before joining the Earth Institute in 2014. She currently co-chairs the NYC chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby and advocates for a carbon fee and dividend.

For more information about the Earth Institute, visit csas.ei.columbia.edu. To see a TED talk by Dr. James Hansen, visit ted.com. To see Crescimanno’s portfolio, visit nicolecrescimanno.com. To see the young people at the forefront of climate solutions, visit climatecountdown.org, a project that Nicole co-produced.

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The Future Is...A'Lelia Bundles: Writing History Herself

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A'Lelia Bundles' story is one of timing and changing tides. Bundles, a 1976 Journalism School alumna, comes from a long line of successful, well-known women, including one of the first African American self-made millionaires and a Harlem Renaissance darling. But rather than go into the family business, Bundles took her own path—in 1960, she discovered her calling as a writer at the ripe old age of eight, during an era of big changes. 

For our first episode in the The Future Is... mini-series, we're honored to feature Bundles, a University Trustee, veteran journalist, and author. 

She spent over 30 years as a producer and executive for NBC News and ABC News. She's currently writing her fifth book, The Joy Goddess of Harlem: A’Lelia Walker and the Harlem Renaissance, which will be released in the next couple of years. The biography that Bundles wrote about her great-great-grandmother, On Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker, was recently optioned for a television series featuring Oscar award-winner, Octavia Spencer, in the lead role.  

In addition to writing, Bundles is active as the chairman of the board of the National Archives Foundation and the president of her family's historical archives. She serves on the advisory boards of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's Schlesinger Library at Harvard and the March on Washington Film Festival. 

Bundles has delivered keynote addresses and served as master of ceremonies at dozens of events, book festivals, and conferences at Harvard, London City Hall, the National Archives, and more, and on all the major television and radio networks, including ABC, NBC, CBS, BBC, PBS, and NPR.

For more information about Bundles' career and writing, visit http://www.aleliabundles.com

 

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The Future Is...Introducing a New Mini-Series

You know we love highlighting inspiring alumni -- and this time, we’re focusing specifically on Columbia women who are at the top of their game, the leaders of today and tomorrow. That’s why we’re excited to share The Future Is… a podcast mini-series featuring interviews with alumnae who are the leaders of today and the creators of tomorrow.

We’ve curated a list of incredible women doing incredible things: you’ll hear from an award-winning filmmaker with two TED talks under her belt, from an artist-turned-climate "strategist," and four voices of the future, the top women in engineering on campus.

This podcast mini-series is produced by Shanna Crumley '18SIPA, our digital initiatives intern and a second-year graduate student in international affairs at Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs. Here are her thoughts on this mini-series: 

"As a current graduate student at Columbia, I’m always keeping an eye out for great role models and stories that I can relate to as I start my career. As a woman, especially, I look for other women whose experiences can help me navigate the nuances of modern womanhood.

For this mini-series, I had the chance to look for women who are innovators, creating the future in a variety of fields like climate change, computer science and journalism. I found women doing cool things, and then I asked them about their work, their thoughts on their fields and what inspires them. And I promised one thing:  I WILL NOT ask podcast guests what they’re wearing; I WILL ask about their ideas, opinions, jobs, plans and what makes them tick."

Stay tuned for the first episode next week on here on the blog, Soundcloud, or iTunes. 


Talking Science with Brian Greene

You may have noticed that we’ve been digging into our archives a lot. To be fair, there’s a lot of interesting stuff going on at Columbia and we want to revisit some talks that haven’t gotten a lot of attention lately. One of those talks was with Columbia physicist Brian Greene. In 2014 he sat down with the writer, and award-winning TV correspondent, Gideon Yago '00CC to talk about World Science U, Columbia's Science Initiative, and some of his out-of-this-world ideas.

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Jack Dorsey's Tools for Entrepreneurs

Odds are good that you’ve heard of Jack Dorsey. He’s the co-founder of Twitter and the co-founder of the mobile payment company, Square. In 2013, Dorsey gave a talk at Columbia and, at the time, it was the largest entrepreneurship event in Columbia history, attracting over 1,000 Columbia students, alumni, and friends. Since we’ve been digging into the archives lately, we thought we’d play you some highlights from that keynote address during which he talks about how he turned his obsession with urban maps, punk music, art, and coding into a micro blog that has changed the way we communicate.

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Can Engineers Help Deliver Babies?

babies.jpgLast year, Kristin Myers gave a lecture to Columbia alumni returning to campus for reunion. Myers is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and her talk offered an engineering perspective on why women give birth preterm. Specifically, she explored the biomechanics of pregnancy and how engineers work with clinicians to try to understand why some women give birth before term and how we can stop it. You’re about to hear some excerpts from her talk.

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Jazz, Mind, Brain

f6c905f104558bd22270b819529f0.jpgIf you haven’t heard of the Columbia Center for Jazz Studies, that’s a shame, but we can’t be too disappointed in you. After all, the center is still relatively new. It was founded in 1999 and, since then, it has been integrated into the Core Curriculum at Columbia College. That means a lot of College students are getting exposed to music that isn’t exactly topping the charts nowadays.

But the Center for Jazz Studies takes a more broad view of the genre than one might initially think. Courses at the center look at jazz as it relates to technology, community, innovation, and even neurology. It’s that last approach that you’re going to hear about in this episode.

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Pomp & Circumstance (Rebroadcast)

Note: This is a rebroadcast of an episode about the 2016 Commencement ceremony.

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It's my favorite day of the year. Because it's tens of thousands of people out here being excited about what our students have done. And it's awesome.

- Katharine Conway '02CC, '06TC, '07TC, '12TC
‎Chief of Staff & Secretary of the College at Teachers College

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Columbia's Commencement week ended two weeks ago. New graduates moved out of University housing to start their lives off-campus and the streets of Morningside Heights have emptied out for the summer. In September, new and returning students will move in and the streets will vibrate with excitement and energy again.

But, in this episode, we're not going to look ahead. Instead, we're going to look back at the height of Columbia excitement and energy: Commencement. If you've never experienced Columbia’s Commencement, that's ok. We interviewed alumni, faculty, staff, and students to give you a glimpse at the day.

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Our Brains, Ourselves

brain-banner-copy-2_cropped.jpegFor this episode, we're diving into the archives to play you excerpts from a discussion that took place in 2012. The discussion was called "Understanding Our Brains, Understanding Ourselves," and it brought together an expert panel of Columbia alumni and professors to talk about the brain.

If you've ever wondered what smell New Yorkers like the most and what smell they hate, you've definitely come to the right place.

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