The One Key Success Trait for Your Career

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on SixFigureStart.com

If I could wish one success trait for my clients, it would be¬†follow-through‚ÄĒdoing¬†something¬†with the recommendations that are given.

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5 Reasons to Work with a Columbia Career Coach


The Columbia Career Coaches Network is a group of seasoned career professionals‚ÄĒand they're also your fellow alumni. Here, they weigh in on why it's incredibly valuable to work with a coach to better your career.¬†

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First Job Myths

By Michella Chiu '13GSAS of the Columbia Career Coaches Network

Whether your first "professional" job is important or not has been a prevalent debate, in which there are a multitude of answers and opinions. The sheer number of answer and opinions provided can be all right or all wrong. In reality, there are factors at play that are important and there are factors that are not. If you are a graduate fresh out of college, you need to judge what is important for you to consider with your first job and what is not vitally important.

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Decision-Making Strategies for Dual-Career Couples

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

As a recruiter, I've seen many job offers fall apart over the significant other. For example, in a relocation, the candidate was willing to make the move, but the partner nixed it. Even in an offer situation for the same city, a partner's hesitation could derail the deal. A deal-breaker raised by the significant other was so common that one of my recruiting colleagues always included a dinner with the partner during the selling process. 

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An Eight-Step Process to Discover Alternative Careers

By Caroline Ceniza-Levine '93BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

Hannah asks: What are the best ways to determine alternative careers based on one's skills and experience, careers that might not be obvious?

The best way to learn a job is to do the job, but you can't try out every single career idea before settling on one‚ÄĒwho has the time or energy? So, you need to find a way to learn about a career from the outside looking in. Then you can make an informed choice about whether to commit your efforts in that direction. Here is an eight-step process for identifying viable alternative careers:

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What To Do When a Coworker Steals Credit for Your Work

By Melody Wilding '11SW of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

You're sitting in a meeting and a coworker takes credit for your idea. Or maybe you stay late to finish a project, but your name is left off of the final presentation. Your boss grabs the limelight and accepts all the praise.

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What To Do if You're Successful but Miserable at Your Job

By Julia Harris Wexler '83TC, '14BUS of the Columbia Career Coaches Network

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How to Follow Up Effectively When Networking

By Julia Bonem '87BC of the Columbia Career Coaches Network

So, you've pushed back your keyboard and attended events to make new connections. Great start, since networking is the #1 way to find a new job and build professional relationships! But, how do you most effectively follow up with those who can help you land your next role or grow your business?

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5 Signs You're About to Make a Bad Career Decision

By Melody Wilding '11SW of the Columbia Career Coaches Network
Originally published on Forbes.com

Most of the choices we make every day are simple and straightforward: what to wear to work, what to eat for lunch, whether to go to sleep at a reasonable hour or stay up watching Netflix. They don't cause much stress or inner conflict.

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Character Still Counts

Kevin McCarthy '85CC, '91GSAS, of the Columbia Career Coaches Network,
reflects on recent life advice he gave his sons.

After little sleep last night I woke up this morning and struggled to find ways to explain to my two teenage sons that character still counts, that a good man is ultimately defined by his actions and they are still expected to do the right thing because it is the right thing, not because it might bring attention, fame or wealth.

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